Category: Science

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Temporal patterns behind the strength of persistent ties

Henry Navarro, Giovanna Miritello, Arturo Canales, Esteban Moro ArXiV 1706.06188, 2017 [LINK] Summary: Could social media data aid in disaster response and damage assessment? Countries face both an increasing frequency and an increasing intensity of natural disasters resulting from climate change. During such events, citizens turn to social media platforms for disaster-related communication and information. Social media improves situational awareness, facilitates...

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Network Science for kids!

One of my favorite activities is to teach my field or research network science to high-schoolers. We (together with my colleague Cristina Brändle) have been doing that from our university to the local high schools in Madrid. Since they know concepts like equations, probability or geometry, it is somehow easy to show them concepts like what is a network, small...

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Rapid assessment of disaster damage using social media activity

Yury Kryvasheyeu1, Haohui Chen, Nick Obradovich, Esteban Moro, Pascal Van Hentenryck, James Fowler and Manuel Cebrian, Science Advances  11 Mar 2016: Vol. 2, no. 3, e1500779 [LINK] Summary: Could social media data aid in disaster response and damage assessment? Countries face both an increasing frequency and an increasing intensity of natural disasters resulting from climate change. During such events, citizens turn to...

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Searching for someone

From the “Small World Experiment” to the “Red Balloon Challenge,” and beyond We live in a small world, right? But the cost and fragility of navigating it could harm any potential strategy to leverage the power of social networks. Read this fascinating story of the research, experiments, and failures in the quest for using social networks to search information/people:

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More people, more fun: The scaling of events in cities

  This is a recent article publish in Medium.com by David Martín-Corral, Manuel Cebrián and myself in which we analyze the super-scaling of touristic attraction (number of events) with population. Amazingly we found that the number of events (music/theater/sports/etc.) scales super-linearly with the population of the city. So yes! more people means more fun!