#Segregation #visualization #Urban Science

The Atlas of Segregation

Segregation is hurting our societies and specially our cities. But economic inequality isn’t just limited to neighborhoods. The restaurants, stores, and other places we visit in cities are all unequal in their own way. The Atlas of Inequality shows the income inequality of people who visit different places in the Boston metro area. It uses aggregated anonymous location data from digital devices to estimate people’s incomes and where they spend their time. ...

#Netmob #Mobile Phone data #Conferences

Netmob 2019

Another edition of Netmob is happening this year 2019. NetMob is the primary conference in the analysis of mobile phone datasets in social, urban, societal and industrial problems. Previous editions in Boston and Milano brought together more than 250 researchers, practitioners and decision-makers from more 140 institutions and 30 countries. I had the pleasure to organize the 2015 edition and it was a blast to put together so much interesting talks, people, projects. ...

#Twitter #R #Social Networks

Growing old in Twitter

I started using Twitter more than 10 years ago (!). I open an account in this social network in 2008 and although I was not using it too much for the first year, I become a frequent user after that. It has helped me to get news, information both for my personal and professional interests. But not only that, Twitter has been also the data source for our research, that helped us to investigate the relationship between human behavior in the social platform and paramount problems in our society as information propagation, unemployment, disaster damage, political opinion. ...

Important relationships are not bursty

What are the properties of a long-lasting relationship? This important question as intrigued the social scientists during the last decades and has triggered numerous publications, surveys and experiments to detect what patterns are behind social relationships that persist. Probably the most famous finding is that of Granovetter who proposed that strong relationships are the ones more likely to persist in the future. And what is a strong relationship? According to Granovetter, a strong relationship is that with high intensity (a lot of interactions), intimacy (mutual confiding) and large structural redundancy (lots of common friends). ...

Network Science for kids!

One of my favorite activities is to teach my field or research (network science) to high-schoolers. We (together with my colleague Cristina Brändle) have been doing that from our university to the local high schools in Madrid. Since they know concepts like equations, probability or geometry, it is somehow easy to show them concepts like what is a network, small world, friendship paradox or centrality. We usually have transparencies and allow them to work on Excel to perform some calculations which works well to understand the basic concepts of networks. ...

#complexity #social networks

Searching for someone

From the “Small World Experiment” to the “Red Balloon Challenge,” and beyond We live in a small world, right? But the cost and fragility of navigating it could harm any potential strategy to leverage the power of social networks. Read this fascinating story of the research, experiments, and failures in the quest for using social networks to search information/people: [Excerpt of the article] Our ability to search social networks for people and information is fundamental to our success. ...